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Author: Bryan Hollon

I currently serve as Canon Theologian for the Anglican Diocese of the Great Lakes, Professor of Theology at Malone University, and Director of the C.S. Lewis Institute of Northeast Ohio. As a scholar, I specialize in ressourcement theology, which is best exemplified in the work of Henri de Lubac. An Anglican Priest, I planted St. John’s in Canton, Ohio and served as Rector until June of 2021.

Generally speaking, I am a proponent of the great consensual tradition that C.S. Lewis referred to as “Mere Christianity,” and my various activities tend to focus on different aspects of this tradition. My wife is Suzanne, and we met at Baylor University and were married in 1993. We have three children in their teens and twenties.

It is Finished: A Good Friday Reflection

“It is finished”…. these gripping Words from our savior are recorded in only one place in the Bible – the gospel of John chapter 19, vs. 30. Jesus spoke these words some one thousand, nine hundred, and ninety years ago – give or take a few years. We are nearly 2,000 years removed from the original Good Friday. And a lot has happened since that fateful day. The Temple in Jerusalem was destroyed once again,…

Ecce homo: Some reflections on Nietzsche and the crucified

Friedrich Nietzsche was among the most unforgettable philosophers of the 19th century. He was wild in just about every way. He was wild in appearance – an unruly mustache and an intense stare. That is, at least, how he appears in the painted and photographic images. He was famously wild in living, and whether he died of syphilis or cancer is beside the point. Moreover, his ideas were extraordinary; Nietzsche was not your run of…

Reclaiming Sacred Scripture as Sacred “Script”

Without the printing press, the protestant reformation might never have gotten off the ground – at least not so quickly and with such geographical reach. This observation has been made by many scholars over many years. No doubt, the press helped to disseminate reformation ideas far and wide in a short period of time. Likewise, the ability to mass-produce new bible translations in the languages of ordinary people should be seen as one of the great, positive outcomes of…

worship is to bow down

Evangelical Christians are often confused about the nature and purpose of worship. Some of the young people that I encounter hear the word and their minds go to dark, crowded rooms with a praise band performing emotionally charged songs before a swooning audience. They imagine their own role in terms of conjuring up feelings of praise and then expressing those feelings through gestures such as raised hands and closed eyes. I know from many conversations…

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