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Author: Bryan Hollon

I currently serve as Canon Theologian for the Anglican Diocese of the Great Lakes, Professor of Theology at Malone University, and Director of the C.S. Lewis Institute of Northeast Ohio. As a scholar, I specialize in ressourcement theology, which is best exemplified in the work of Henri de Lubac. An Anglican Priest, I planted St. John’s in Canton, Ohio and served as Rector until June of 2021.

Generally speaking, I am a proponent of the great consensual tradition that C.S. Lewis referred to as “Mere Christianity,” and my various activities tend to focus on different aspects of this tradition. My wife is Suzanne, and we met at Baylor University and were married in 1993. We have three children in their teens and twenties.

Spectator Worship

I posted a brief essay last week focusing on the obvious neglect of the Bible in many contemporary worship services. In that post I made one particular comment that was probably unclear to readers not trained in historical theology. Regarding worship services that fail to engage the Bible in a substantial way, I said: “It is a problem of a participatory vs. a non-participatory understanding of human nature in relation to God. Classical Trinitarianism (participatory)…

On Post-Biblical Protestant Evangelicalism

What has happened to evangelical Christian worship? Several years ago, I had an honors class conduct a research project. We broke students into groups of four and sent them into churches of their own choosing in order to examine biblical content in worship services. All of the groups chose to attend services at large, contemporary churches, which are quite typical (in terms of worship culture) of christian churches across the country. Although I did not ask them…

anglican worship 101

I am working with a great group of people to plant an Anglican church in Canton, Ohio where many Christians are unfamiliar with liturgical forms of worship.  The following is thus a very brief introduction for those who are unfamiliar with classic liturgy. It may also serve as a helpful refresher for those who have worshiped this way for some time. In my mind, these four characteristics of Anglican worship are especially noteworthy. First, Anglican…

Miracles are for the Humble

Some Thoughts on Mark 5:21-43 I have a confession to make, and its one that an Anglican priest should, perhaps, not be making.  Namely, I tend to be very skeptical when I hear about miracles from other Christians. In fact, when I hear stories about Christians being healed, I often think of TV preachers and faith healers who pretend to cast the Holy Spirit about so that people might be “slain in the Spirit.” It…

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