Spectator Worship

Spectator Worship

I posted a brief essay last week focusing on the obvious neglect of the Bible in many contemporary worship services. In that post I made one particular comment that was probably unclear to readers not trained in historical theology. Regarding worship services that fail to engage the Bible in a substantial way, I said:

“It is a problem of a participatory vs. a non-participatory understanding of human nature in relation to God. Classical Trinitarianism (participatory) vs. nominalism (non-participatory). Much contemporary worship seems to be nominalist at its core.”

I’d like to spend some time explaining this statement because it really is at the heart of the problem. My hope with these next few posts is to demonstrate why the current situation is a problem and also what presuppositions lie at the root of this problem. I’ll address the following questions in turn.

1. What does it mean to know God?
2. How does the Bible mediate or facilitate our knowledge of God?
3. How does worship relate to the knowledge of God?
4. What are philosophical univocity and nominalism?
5. How do these philosophical positions influence contemporary Christians, distort our understanding of God and thus our relationship with God?